C:\Users\madhudvisa\Desktop\Bg-Original Macmillan Chapter 1.txt
C:\Users\madhudvisa\Desktop\Bg-Revised and Enlarged Chapter 1.TXT
    
    
    
    
    
    
  1 TEXT 1
  2 
  3 TRANSLATION
  4 
  5 Dhrtarastra said: O Sanjaya, after assembling in the 
  > place of pilgrimage at Kuruksetra, what did my sons 
  > and the sons of Pandu dobeing 
  > desirous to fight?
  6 
  7 PURPORT
  8 
  9 Bhagavad-gita is the widely read theistic science 
  > summarized in the Gita-mahatmya (Glorification of the Gita).
  >  There it says that one should read Bhagavad-gita very 
  > scrutinizingly with the help of a person who is a devotee 
  > of Sri Krsna and try to understand it without personally 
  > motivated interpretations. The example of clear 
  > understanding is there in the Bhagavad-gita itself, in the 
  > way the teaching is understood by Arjuna, who heard the 
  > Gita directly from the Lord. If someone is fortunate enough 
  > to understand Bhagavad-gita in that line of disciplic 
  > succession, without motivated interpretation, then he 
  > surpasses all studies of Vedic wisdom, and all scriptures 
  > of the world. One will find in the Bhagavad-gita all that 
  > is contained in other scriptures, but the reader will also 
  > find things which are not to be found elsewhere. That is 
  > the specific standard of the Gita. It is the perfect 
  > theistic science because it is directly spoken by the 
  > Supreme Personality of Godhead, Lord Sri Krsna.
 10 
 11 The topics discussed by Dhrtarastra and Sanjaya, as 
  > described in the Mahabharata, form the basic principle for 
  > this great philosophy. It is understood that this 
  > philosophy evolved on the Battlefield of Kuruksetra, which 
  > is a sacred place of pilgrimage from the immemorial time of 
  > the Vedic age. It was spoken by the Lord when He was 
  > present personally on this planet for the guidance of 
  > mankind.
 12 
 13 The word dharma-ksetra (a place where religious rituals are 
  > performed) is significant because, on the Battlefield of 
  > Kuruksetra, the Supreme Personality of Godhead was present 
  > on the side of Arjuna. Dhrtarastra, the father of the Kurus,
  >  was highly doubtful about the possibility of his sons' 
  > ultimate victory. In his doubt, he inquired from his 
  > secretary Sanjaya, "What did my sons and the sons of 
  > Pandu do?" He was confident that both his sons and the sons 
  > of his younger brother Pandu were assembled in that Field 
  > of Kuruksetra for a determined engagement of the war. Still,
  >  his inquiry is significant. He did not want a compromise 
  > between the cousins and brothers, and he wanted to be sure 
  > of the fate of his sons on the battlefield. Because the 
  > battle was arranged to be fought at Kuruksetra, which is 
  > mentioned elsewhere in the Vedas as a place of worship-even 
  > for the denizens of heaven-Dhrtarastra became very fearful 
  > about the influence of the holy place on the outcome of the 
  > battle. He knew very well that this would influence Arjuna 
  > and the sons of Pandu favorably, because by nature they 
  > were all virtuous. Sanjaya was a student of Vyasa, and 
  > therefore, by the mercy of Vyasa, Sanjaya was able to 
  > envision the Battlefield of Kuruksetra even while he was in 
  > the room of Dhrtarastra. And so, Dhrtarastra asked him 
  > about the situation on the battlefield.
 14 
 15 Both the Pandavas and the sons of Dhrtarastra belong to the 
  > same family, but Dhrtarastra's mind is disclosed herein. He 
  > deliberately claimed only his sons as Kurus, and he 
  > separated the sons of Pandu from the family heritage. One 
  > can thus understand the specific position of Dhrtarastra in 
  > his relationship with his nephews, the sons of Pandu. As in 
  > the paddy field the unnecessary plants are taken out, so it 
  > is expected from the very beginning of these topics that in 
  > the religious field of Kuruksetra where the father of 
  > religion, Sri Krsna, was present, the unwanted plants like 
  > Dhrtarastra's son Duryodhana and others would be wiped out 
  > and the thoroughly religious persons, headed by Yudhisthira,
  >  would be established by the Lord. This is the significance 
  > of the words dharma-ksetre and kuru-ksetre, apart from 
  > their historical and Vedic importance.
 16 
 17 Bg 1.2
 18 
 19 TEXT 2
 20 
 21 TRANSLATION
 22 
 23 Sanjaya said: O King, after looking over the army gathered
  >  by the sons of Pandu, King Duryodhana 
  > went to his teacher and began to speak the following words:
 24 
 25 PURPORT
 26 
 27 Dhrtarastra was blind from birth. Unfortunately, he was 
  > also bereft of spiritual vision. He knew very well that his 
  > sons were equally blind in the matter of religion, and he 
  > was sure that they could never reach an understanding with 
  > the Pandavas, who were all pious since birth. Still he was 
  > doubtful about the influence of the place of pilgrimage, 
  > and Sanjaya could understand his motive in asking about the 
  > situation on the battlefield. He wanted, therefore, to 
  > encourage the despondent King, and thus he warned him 
  > that his sons were not going to make any sort of compromise 
  > under the influence of the holy place. Sanjaya therefore 
  > informed the King that his son, Duryodhana, after seeing 
  > the military force of the Pandavas, at once went to the 
  > commander-in-chief, Dronacarya, to inform him of the real 
  > position. Although Duryodhana is mentioned as the king, he 
  > still had to go to the commander on account of the 
  > seriousness of the situation. He was therefore quite fit to 
  > be a politician. But Duryodhana's diplomatic veneer could 
  > not disguise the fear he felt when he saw the military 
  > arrangement of the Pandavas.
 28 
 29 Bg 1.3
 30 
 31 TEXT 3
 32 
 33 TRANSLATION
 34 
 35 O my teacher, behold the great army of the sons of Pandu, 
  > so expertly arranged by your intelligent disciple, the son 
  > of Drupada.
 36 
 37 PURPORT
 38 
 39 Duryodhana, a great diplomat, wanted to point out the 
  > defects of Dronacarya, the great brahmana commander-in-
  > chief. Dronacarya had some political quarrel with King 
  > Drupada, the father of Draupadi, who was Arjuna's wife. As 
  > a result of this quarrel, Drupada performed a great 
  > sacrifice, by which he received the benediction of having a 
  > son who would be able to kill Dronacarya. Dronacarya knew 
  > this perfectly well, and yet, as a liberal brahmana, he did 
  > not hesitate to impart all his military secrets when the 
  > son of Drupada, Dhrstadyumna, was entrusted to him for 
  > military education. Now, on the Battlefield of Kuruksetra, 
  > Dhrstadyumna took the side of the Pandavas, and it was he 
  > who arranged for their military phalanx, after having 
  > learned the art from Dronacarya. Duryodhana pointed out 
  > this mistake of Dronacarya's so that he might be alert and 
  > uncompromising in the fighting. By this he wanted to point 
  > out also that he should not be similarly lenient in battle 
  > against the Pandavas, who were also Dronacarya's 
  > affectionate students. Arjuna, especially, was his most 
  > affectionate and brilliant student. Duryodhana also warned 
  > that such leniency in the fight would lead to defeat.
 40 
 41 Bg 1.4
 42 
 43 TEXT 4
 44 
 45 TRANSLATION
 46 
 47 Here in this army there are many heroic bowmen equal in 
  > fighting to Bhima and Arjuna; there are also great fighters 
  > like Yuyudhana, Virata and Drupada.
 48 
 49 PURPORT
 50 
 51 Even though Dhrstadyumna was not a very important obstacle 
  > in the face of Dronacarya's very great power in the 
  > military art, there were many others who were the cause 
  > of fear. They are mentioned by Duryodhana as great 
  > stumbling blocks on the path of victory because each and 
  > every one of them was as formidable as Bhima and Arjuna. He 
  > knew the strength of Bhima and Arjuna, and thus he compared 
  > the others with them.
 52 
 53 Bg 1.5
 54 
 55 TEXT 5
 56 
 57 TRANSLATION
 58 
 59 There are also great, heroic, powerful fighters like 
  > Dhrstaketu, Cekitana, Kasiraja, Purujit, Kuntibhoja and 
  > Saibya.
 60 
 61 Bg 1.6
 62 
 63 TEXT 6
 64 
 65 TRANSLATION
 66 
 67 There are the mighty Yudhamanyu, the very powerful 
  > Uttamauja, the son of Subhadra and the sons of Draupadi. 
  > All these warriors are great chariot fighters.
 68 
 69 Bg 1.7
 70 
 71 TEXT 7
 72 
 73 TRANSLATION
 74 
 75 O best of the brahmanas, for your 
  > information, let me tell you about the captains who are 
  > especially qualified to lead my military force.
 76 
 77 Bg 1.8
 78 
 79 TEXT 8
 80 
 81 TRANSLATION
 82 
 83 There are personalities like yourself, Bhisma, Karna, Krpa, 
  > Asvatthama, Vikarna and the son of Somadatta called 
  > Bhurisrava, who are always victorious in battle.
 84 
 85 PURPORT
 86 
 87 Duryodhana mentioned the exceptional heroes in the battle, 
  > all of whom are ever-victorious. Vikarna is the brother of 
  > Duryodhana, Asvatthama is the son of Dronacarya, and 
  > Saumadatti, or Bhurisrava, is the son of the King of the 
  > Bahlikas. Karna is the half brother of Arjuna, as he was 
  > born of Kunti before her marriage with King Pandu. 
  > Krpacarya married the twin sister of Dronacarya.
 88 
 89 Bg 1.9
 90 
 91 TEXT 9
 92 
 93 TRANSLATION
 94 
 95 There are many other heroes who are prepared to lay down 
  > their lives for my sake. All of them are well equipped with 
  > different kinds of weapons, and all are experienced in 
  > military science.
 96 
 97 PURPORT
 98 
 99 As far as the others are concerned-like Jayadratha, 
  > Krtavarma, Salya, etc.-all are determined to lay down 
  > their lives for Duryodhana's sake. In other words, it is 
  > already concluded that all of them would die in the Battle 
  > of Kuruksetra for joining the party of the sinful 
  > Duryodhana. Duryodhana was, of course, confident of his 
  > victory on account of the above-mentioned combined strength 
  > of his friends.
100 
101 Bg 1.10
102 
103 TEXT 10
104 
105 TRANSLATION
106 
107 Our strength is immeasurable, and we are perfectly 
  > protected by Grandfather Bhisma, whereas the strength of 
  > the Pandavas, carefully protected by Bhima, is limited.
108 
109 PURPORT
110 
111 Herein an estimation of comparative strength is made by 
  > Duryodhana. He thinks that the strength of his armed forces 
  > is immeasurable, being specifically protected by the most 
  > experienced general, Grandfather Bhisma. On the other hand, 
  > the forces of the Pandavas are limited, being protected by 
  > a less experienced general, Bhima, who is like a fig in the 
  > presence of Bhisma. Duryodhana was always envious of Bhima 
  > because he knew perfectly well that if he should die at all,
  >  he would only be killed by Bhima. But at the same time, he 
  > was confident of his victory on account of the presence of 
  > Bhisma, who was a far superior general. His conclusion that 
  > he would come out of the battle victorious was well 
  > ascertained.
112 
113 Bg 1.11
114 
115 TEXT 11
116 
117 TRANSLATION
118 
119 Now all of you must give full support to Grandfather 
  > Bhisma, standing at your respective strategic 
  > points in the phalanx of the army.
120 
121 PURPORT
122 
123 Duryodhana, after praising the prowess of Bhisma, further 
  > considered that others might think that they had been 
  > considered less important, so in his usual diplomatic way, 
  > he tried to adjust the situation in the above words. He 
  > emphasized that Bhismadeva was undoubtedly the greatest 
  > hero, but he was an old man, so everyone must especially 
  > think of his protection from all sides. He might become 
  > engaged in the fight, and the enemy might take advantage of 
  > his full engagement on one side. Therefore, it was 
  > important that other heroes would not leave their strategic 
  > positions and allow the enemy to break the phalanx. 
  > Duryodhana clearly felt that the victory of the Kurus 
  > depended on the presence of Bhismadeva. He was confident of 
  > the full support of Bhismadeva and Dronacarya in the battle 
  > because he well knew that they did not even speak a word 
  > when Arjuna's wife Draupadi, in her helpless condition, had 
  > appealed to them for justice while she was being forced to 
  > strip naked in the presence of all the great generals in 
  > the assembly. Although he knew that the two generals had 
  > some sort of affection for the Pandavas, he hoped that 
  > all such affection would now be completely given up by 
  > them, as was customary during the gambling 
  > performances.
124 
125 Bg 1.12
126 
127 TEXT 12
128 
129 TRANSLATION
130 
131 Then Bhisma, the great valiant grandsire of the Kuru 
  > dynasty, the grandfather of the fighters, blew his 
  > conchshell very loudly like the sound of a 
  > lion, giving Duryodhana joy.
132 
133 PURPORT
134 
135 The grandsire of the Kuru dynasty could understand the 
  > inner meaning of the heart of his grandson Duryodhana, and 
  > out of his natural compassion for him he tried to cheer him 
  > by blowing his conchshell very loudly, befitting his 
  > position as a lion. Indirectly, by the symbolism of the 
  > conchshell, he informed his depressed grandson Duryodhana 
  > that he had no chance of victory in the battle, because the 
  > Supreme Lord Krsna was on the other side. But still, it was 
  > his duty to conduct the fight, and no pains would be spared 
  > in that connection.
136 
137 Bg 1.13
138 
139 TEXT 13
140 
141 TRANSLATION
142 
143 After that, the conchshells, bugles, trumpets, drums and 
  > horns were all suddenly sounded, and the combined sound was 
  > tumultuous.
144 
145 Bg 1.14
146 
147 TEXT 14
148 
149 TRANSLATION
150 
151 On the other side, both Lord Krsna and Arjuna, stationed on 
  > a great chariot drawn by white horses, sounded their 
  > transcendental conchshells.
152 
153 PURPORT
154 
155 In contrast with the conchshell blown by Bhismadeva, the 
  > conchshells in the hands of Krsna and Arjuna are described 
  > as transcendental. The sounding of the transcendental 
  > conchshells indicated that there was no hope of victory for 
  > the other side because Krsna was on the side of the 
  > Pandavas. Jayas tu pandu-putranam yesam pakse janardanah. 
  > Victory is always with persons like the sons of Pandu 
  > because Lord Krsna is associated with them. And whenever 
  > and wherever the Lord is present, the goddess of fortune is 
  > also there because the goddess of fortune never lives alone 
  > without her husband. Therefore, victory and fortune were 
  > awaiting Arjuna, as indicated by the transcendental sound 
  > produced by the conchshell of Visnu, or Lord Krsna. Besides 
  > that, the chariot on which both the friends were seated was
  >  donated by Agni (the fire-god) to Arjuna, and this 
  > indicated that this chariot was capable of conquering all 
  > sides, wherever it was drawn over the three worlds.
156 
157 Bg 1.15
158 
159 TEXT 15
160 
161 TRANSLATION
162 
163 Then, Lord Krsna blew His conchshell, called Pancajanya; 
  > Arjuna blew his, the Devadatta; and Bhima, the voracious 
  > eater and performer of Herculean tasks, blew his terrific 
  > conchshell called Paundram.
164 
165 PURPORT
166 
167 Lord Krsna is referred to as Hrsikesa in this verse because 
  > He is the owner of all senses The living entities are part 
  > and parcel of Him, and, therefore, the senses of the living 
  > entities are also part and parcel of His senses. The 
  > impersonalists cannot account for the senses of the living 
  > entities, and therefore they are always anxious to describe 
  > all living entities as sense-less, or impersonal. The Lord, 
  > situated in the hearts of all living entities, directs 
  > their senses. But, He directs in terms of the surrender of 
  > the living entity, and in the case of a pure devotee He 
  > directly controls the senses. Here on the Battlefield of 
  > Kuruksetra the Lord directly controls the transcendental 
  > senses of Arjuna, and thus His particular name of Hrsikesa. 
  > The Lord has different names according to His different 
  > activities. For example, His name is Madhusudana because He 
  > killed the demon of the name Madhu; His name is Govinda 
  > because He gives pleasure to the cows and to the senses; 
  > His name is Vasudeva because He appeared as the son of 
  > Vasudeva; His name is Devaki-nandana because He accepted 
  > Devaki as His mother; His name is Yasoda-nandana because He 
  > awarded His childhood pastimes to Yasoda at Vrndavana; His 
  > name is Partha-sarathi because He worked as charioteer of 
  > His friend Arjuna. Similarly, His name is Hrsikesa because 
  > He gave direction to Arjuna on the Battlefield of 
  > Kuruksetra.
168 
169 Arjuna is referred to as Dhananjaya in this verse because 
  > he helped his elder brother in fetching wealth when it was 
  > required by the King to make expenditures for different 
  > sacrifices. Similarly, Bhima is known as Vrkodara because 
  > he could eat as voraciously as he could perform Herculean 
  > tasks, such as killing the demon Hidimba. So, the 
  > particular types of conchshell blown by the different 
  > personalities on the side of the Pandavas, beginning with 
  > the Lord's, were all very encouraging to the fighting 
  > soldiers. On the other side there were no such credits, nor 
  > the presence of Lord Krsna, the supreme director, nor that 
  > of the goddess of fortune. So, they were predestined to 
  > lose the battle-and that was the message announced by the 
  > sounds of the conchshells.
170 
171 Bg 1.16, Bg 1.17, Bg 1.18, Bg 1.16-18
172 
173 TEXTS 16-18
174 
175 TRANSLATION
176 
177 King Yudhisthira, the son of Kunti, blew his conchshell, 
  > the Anantavijaya, and Nakula and Sahadeva blew the 
  > Sughosa and Manipuspaka. That great archer the King of Kasi,
  >  the great fighter Sikhandi, Dhrstadyumna, Virata and the 
  > unconquerable Satyaki, Drupada, the sons of Draupadi, and 
  > the others, O King, such as the son of 
  > Subhadra, greatly armed, all blew their respective 
  > conchshells.
178 
179 PURPORT
180 
181 Sanjaya informed King Dhrtarastra very tactfully that his 
  > unwise policy of deceiving the sons of Pandu and 
  > endeavoring to enthrone his own sons on the seat of the 
  > kingdom was not very laudable. The signs already clearly 
  > indicated that the whole Kuru dynasty would be killed in 
  > that great battle. Beginning with the grandsire, Bhisma, 
  > down to the grandsons like Abhimanyu and others-including 
  > kings from many states of the world-all were present there, 
  > and all were doomed. The whole catastrophe was due to King 
  > Dhrtarastra, because he encouraged the policy followed by 
  > his sons.
182 
183 Bg 1.19
184 
185 TEXT 19
186 
187 TRANSLATION
188 
189 The blowing of these different conchshells became 
  > uproarious, and thus, vibrating both in the sky and 
  > on the earth, it shattered the hearts of the sons of 
  > Dhrtarastra.
190 
191 PURPORT
192 
193 When Bhisma and the others on the side of Duryodhana blew 
  > their respective conchshells, there was no heart-breaking 
  > on the part of the Pandavas. Such occurrences are not 
  > mentioned, but in this particular verse it is mentioned 
  > that the hearts of the sons of Dhrtarastra were shattered 
  > by the sounds vibrated by the Pandavas' party. This is due 
  > to the Pandavas and their confidence in Lord Krsna. One who 
  > takes shelter of the Supreme Lord has nothing to fear, even 
  > in the midst of the greatest calamity.
194 
195 Bg 1.20
196 
197 TEXT 20
198 
199 TRANSLATION
200 
201 O King, at that time Arjuna, the son of Pandu, who was 
  > seated in his chariot, his flag marked with Hanuman,
  >  took up his bow and prepared to shoot his arrows, 
  > looking at the sons of Dhrtarastra. O King
  > , Arjuna then spoke to Hrsikesa [Krsna] these 
  > words:
202 
203 PURPORT
204 
205 The battle was just about to begin. It is understood from 
  > the above statement that the sons of Dhrtarastra were more 
  > or less disheartened by the unexpected arrangement of 
  > military force by the Pandavas, who were guided by the 
  > direct instructions of Lord Krsna on the battlefield. The 
  > emblem of Hanuman on the flag of Arjuna is another sign of 
  > victory because Hanuman cooperated with Lord Rama in the 
  > battle between Rama and Ravana, and Lord Rama emerged 
  > victorious. Now both Rama and Hanuman were present on the 
  > chariot of Arjuna to help him. Lord Krsna is Rama Himself, 
  > and wherever Lord Rama is, His eternal servitor Hanuman and 
  > His eternal consort Sita, the goddess of fortune, are 
  > present. Therefore, Arjuna had no cause to fear any enemies 
  > whatsoever. And above all, the Lord of the senses, Lord 
  > Krsna, was personally present to give him direction. Thus, 
  > all good counsel was available to Arjuna in the matter of 
  > executing the battle. In such auspicious conditions, 
  > arranged by the Lord for His eternal devotee, lay the signs 
  > of assured victory.
206 
207 Bg 1.21, Bg 1.22, Bg 1.21-22
208 
209 TEXTS 21-22
210 
211 TRANSLATION
212 
213 Arjuna said: O infallible one, please draw my chariot 
  > between the two armies so that I may see who is present 
  > here, who is desirous of fighting, and with whom I must 
  > contend in this great battle attempt.
214 
215 PURPORT
216 
217 Although Lord Krsna is the Supreme Personality of Godhead, 
  > out of His causeless mercy He was engaged in the service of 
  > His friend. He never fails in His affection for His 
  > devotees, and thus He is addressed herein as infallible. As 
  > charioteer, He had to carry out the orders of Arjuna, and 
  > since He did not hesitate to do so, He is addressed as 
  > infallible. Although He had accepted the position of a 
  > charioteer for His devotee, His supreme position was not 
  > challenged. In all circumstances, He is the Supreme 
  > Personality of Godhead, Hrsikesa, the Lord of the total 
  > senses. The relationship between the Lord and His servitor 
  > is very sweet and transcendental. The servitor is always 
  > ready to render a service to the Lord, and, similarly, the 
  > Lord is always seeking an opportunity to render some 
  > service to the devotee. He takes greater pleasure in His 
  > pure devotee's assuming the advantageous postion of 
  > ordering Him than He does in being the giver of orders. 
  > As master, everyone is under His orders, and no 
  > one is above Him to order Him. But when he finds that a 
  > pure devotee is ordering Him, He obtains transcendental 
  > pleasure, although He is the infallible master of all 
  > circumstances.
218 
219 As a pure devotee of the Lord, Arjuna had no desire to 
  > fight with his cousins and brothers, but he was forced to 
  > come onto the battlefield by the obstinacy of Duryodhana, 
  > who was never agreeable to any peaceful negotiation. 
  > Therefore, he was very anxious to see who the leading 
  > persons present on the battlefield were. Although there was 
  > no question of a peacemaking endeavor on the battlefield, 
  > he wanted to see them again, and to see how much they were 
  > bent upon demanding an unwanted war.
220 
221 Bg 1.23
222 
223 TEXT 23
224 
225 TRANSLATION
226 
227 Let me see those who have come here to fight, wishing to 
  > please the evil-minded son of Dhrtarastra.
228 
229 PURPORT
230 
231 It was an open secret that Duryodhana wanted to usurp the 
  > kingdom of the Pandavas by evil plans, in collaboration 
  > with his father, Dhrtarastra. Therefore, all persons who 
  > had joined the side of Duryodhana must have been birds of 
  > the same feather. Arjuna wanted to see them in the 
  > battlefield before the fight was begun, just to learn who 
  > they were, but he had no intention of proposing peace 
  > negotiations with them. It was also a fact that he wanted 
  > to see them to make an estimate of the strength which he 
  > had to face, although he was quite confident of victory 
  > because Krsna was sitting by his side.
232 
233 Bg 1.24
234 
235 TEXT 24
236 
237 TRANSLATION
238 
239 Sanjaya said: O descendant of Bharata, being thus 
  > addressed by Arjuna, Lord Krsna drew up the fine chariot in 
  > the midst of the armies of both parties.
240 
241 PURPORT
242 
243 In this verse Arjuna is referred to as Gudakesa. Gudaka 
  > means sleep, and one who conquers sleep is called gudakesa. 
  > Sleep also means ignorance. So Arjuna conquered both sleep 
  > and ignorance because of his friendship with Krsna. As a 
  > great devotee of Krsna, he could not forget Krsna even for 
  > a moment, because that is the nature of a devotee. Either 
  > in waking or in sleep, a devotee of the Lord can never be 
  > free from thinking of Krsna's name, form, quality and 
  > pastimes. Thus a devotee of Krsna can conquer both sleep 
  > and ignorance simply by thinking of Krsna constantly. This 
  > is called Krsna consciousness, or samadhi. As Hrsikesa, or 
  > the director of the senses and mind of every living entity, 
  > Krsna could understand Arjuna's purpose in placing the 
  > chariot in the midst of the armies. Thus He did so, and 
  > spoke as follows.
244 
245 Bg 1.25
246 
247 TEXT 25
248 
249 TRANSLATION
250 
251 In the presence of Bhisma, Drona and all other 
  > chieftains of the world, Hrsikesa, the Lord, said, Just 
  > behold, Partha, all the Kurus who are assembled here.
252 
253 PURPORT
254 
255 As the Supersoul of all living entities, Lord Krsna could 
  > understand what was going on in the mind of Arjuna. The use 
  > of the word Hrsikesa in this connection indicates that He 
  > knew everything. And the word Partha, or the son of Kunti 
  > or Prtha, is also similarly significant in reference to 
  > Arjuna. As a friend, He wanted to inform Arjuna that 
  > because Arjuna was the son of Prtha, the sister of His own 
  > father Vasudeva, He had agreed to be the charioteer of 
  > Arjuna. Now what did Krsna mean when He told Arjuna to "
  > behold the Kurus"? Did Arjuna want to stop there and not 
  > fight? Krsna never expected such things from the son of His 
  > aunt Prtha. The mind of Arjuna was thus predicated by the 
  > Lord in friendly joking.
256 
257 Bg 1.26
258 
259 TEXT 26
260 
261 TRANSLATION
262 
263 There Arjuna could see, within the midst of the armies of 
  > both parties, his fathers, grandfathers, teachers, maternal 
  > uncles, brothers, sons, grandsons, friends, and also his 
  > father-in-law and well-wishers-all present there.
264 
265 PURPORT
266 
267 On the battlefield Arjuna could see all kinds of relatives. 
  > He could see persons like Bhurisrava, who were his father's 
  > contemporaries, grandfathers Bhisma and Somadatta, teachers 
  > like Dronacarya and Krpacarya, maternal uncles like Salya 
  > and Sakuni, brothers like Duryodhana, sons like Laksmana, 
  > friends like Asvatthama, well-wishers like Krtavarma, etc. 
  > He could see also the armies which contained many of his 
  > friends.
268 
269 Bg 1.27
270 
271 TEXT 27
272 
273 TRANSLATION
274 
275 When the son of Kunti, Arjuna, saw all these different 
  > grades of friends and relatives, he became overwhelmed with 
  > compassion and spoke thus:
276 
277 Bg 1.28
278 
279 TEXT 28
280 
281 TRANSLATION
282 
283 Arjuna said: My dear Krsna, seeing my friends and relatives 
  > present before me in such a fighting spirit, I feel the 
  > limbs of my body quivering and my mouth drying up.
284 
285 PURPORT
286 
287 Any man who has genuine devotion to the Lord has all the 
  > good qualities which are found in godly persons or in the 
  > demigods, whereas the nondevotee, however advanced he may 
  > be in material qualifications by education and culture, 
  > lacks in godly qualities. As such, Arjuna, just after 
  > seeing his kinsmen, friends and relatives on the 
  > battlefield, was at once overwhelmed by compassion for them 
  > who had so decided to fight amongst themselves. As far as 
  > his soldiers were concerned, he was sympathetic from the 
  > beginning, but he felt compassion even for the soldiers of 
  > the opposite party, foreseeing their imminent death. And 
  > so thinking, the limbs of his body began to 
  > quiver, and his mouth became dry. He was more or less 
  > astonished to see their fighting spirit. Practically the 
  > whole community, all blood relatives of Arjuna, had come to 
  > fight with him. This overwhelmed a kind devotee like Arjuna.
  >  Although it is not mentioned here, still one can easily 
  > imagine that not only were Arjuna's bodily limbs quivering 
  > and his mouth drying up, but that he was also crying out of 
  > compassion. Such symptoms in Arjuna were not due to 
  > weakness but to his softheartedness, a characteristic of a 
  > pure devotee of the Lord. It is said therefore:
288 
289 yasyasti bhaktir bhagavaty akincana
290 
291 sarvair gunais tatra samasate surah
292 
293 harav abhaktasya kuto mahad-guna
  > 
294 mano-rathenasati dhavato bahih
295 
296 "One who has unflinching devotion for the Personality of 
297 Godhead has all the good qualities of the demigods. But one 
  > who is not a devotee of the Lord has only material 
  > qualifications that are of little value. This is because he 
  > is hovering on the mental plane and is certain to be 
  > attracted by the glaring material energy." (Bhag. 5.18.12)
  > 
298 Bg 1.29
299 
300 TEXT 29
301 
302 TRANSLATION
303 
304 My whole body is trembling, and my hair is standing on end. 
305 My bow Gandiva is slipping from my hand, and my skin is 
  > burning.
  > 
306 PURPORT
307 
308 There are two kinds of trembling of the body, and two kinds 
309 of standings of the hair on end. Such phenomena occur 
  > either in great spiritual ecstasy or out of great fear 
  > under material conditions. There is no fear in 
  > transcendental realization. Arjuna's symptoms in this 
  > situation are out of material fear-namely, loss of life. 
  > This is evident from other symptoms also; he became so 
  > impatient that his famous bow Gandiva was slipping from his 
  > hands, and, because his heart was burning within him, he 
  > was feeling a burning sensation of the skin. All these are 
  > due to a material conception of life.
  > 
310 Bg 1.30
311 
312 TEXT 30
313 
314 TRANSLATION
315 
316 I am now unable to stand here any longer. I am forgetting 
317 myself, and my mind is reeling. I foresee only evil
  > , O killer of the Kesi demon.
  > 
318 PURPORT
319 
320 Due to his impatience, Arjuna was unable to stay on the 
321 battlefield, and he was forgetting himself on account of 
  > the weakness of his mind. Excessive attachment for 
  > material things puts a man in a bewildering condition 
  > of existence. Bhayam dvitiyabhinivesatah
  > : such fearfulness and loss of mental equilibrium 
  > take place in persons who are too affected by material 
  > conditions. Arjuna envisioned only unhappiness in 
  > the battlefield-he would not be happy even by gaining 
  > victory over the foe. The word nimitta is 
  > significant. When a man sees only frustration in his 
  > expectations, he thinks, "Why am I here?" Everyone is 
  > interested in himself and his own welfare. No one is 
  > interested in the Supreme Self. Arjuna is supposed 
  > to show disregard for self-interest by submission 
  > to the will of Krsna, who is everyone's real self-
  > interest. The conditioned soul 
  > forgets this, and therefore suffers material pains. Arjuna 
  > thought that his victory in the battle would only be a 
  > cause of lamentation for him.
  > 
322 Bg 1.31
323 
324 TEXT 31
325 
326 TRANSLATION
327 
328 I do not see how any good can come from killing my own 
329 kinsmen in this battle, nor can I, my dear Krsna, desire 
  > any subsequent victory, kingdom, or happiness.
  > 
330 PURPORT
331 
332 Without knowing that one's self-interest is in Visnu (or 
333 Krsna), conditioned souls are attracted by bodily 
  > relationships, hoping to be happy in such situations. Under 
  > delusion, they forget that Krsna is also
  >  the cause of material happiness. Arjuna appears to 
  > have even forgotten the moral codes for a ksatriya. It is 
  > said that two kinds of men, namely the ksatriya who dies 
  > directly in front of the battlefield under Krsna's personal 
  > orders and the person in the renounced order of life who is 
  > absolutely devoted to spiritual culture, are eligible to 
  > enter into the sun-globe, which is so powerful and dazzling.
  >  Arjuna is reluctant even to kill his enemies, let alone 
  > his relatives. He thought that by killing his kinsmen there 
  > would be no happiness in his life, and therefore he was not 
  > willing to fight, just as a person who does not feel hunger 
  > is not inclined to cook. He has now decided to go into the 
  > forest and live a secluded life in frustration. But as a 
  > ksatriya, he requires a kingdom for his subsistence, 
  > because the ksatriyas cannot engage themselves in any other 
  > occupation. But Arjuna has had no kingdom. Arjuna's sole 
  > opportunity for gaining a kingdom lay in fighting with his 
  > cousins and brothers and reclaiming the kingdom inherited 
  > from his father, which he does not like to do. Therefore he 
  > considers himself fit to go to the forest to live a 
  > secluded life of frustration.
  > 
334 Bg 1.32, Bg 1.33, Bg 1.34, Bg 1.35, Bg 1.32-35
335 
336 TEXTS 32-35
337 
338 TRANSLATION
339 
340 O Govinda, of what avail to us are kingdoms
341 happiness or even life itself when all those for whom we 
  > may desire them are now arrayed in this battlefield? O 
  > Madhusudana, when teachers, fathers, sons, grandfathers, 
  > maternal uncles, fathers-in-law, grandsons, brothers-in-law 
  > and all relatives are ready to give up their lives and 
  > properties and are standing before me, then why should I 
  > wish to kill them, though I may survive?
  >  O maintainer of all creatures, I am not prepared 
  > to fight with them even in exchange for the three worlds, 
  > let alone this earth.
    
  > 
342 PURPORT
343 
344 Arjuna has addressed Lord Krsna as Govinda because Krsna is 
345 the object of all pleasures for cows and the senses. By 
  > using this significant word, Arjuna indicates 
  > what will satisfy his senses. 
  > Although Govinda is not meant for satisfying our senses, if 
  > we try to satisfy the senses of Govinda then 
  > automatically our own senses are satisfied. Materially, 
  > everyone wants to satisfy his senses, and he wants God to 
  > be the order supplier for such satisfaction. The Lord will 
  > satisfy the senses of the living entities as much as they 
  > deserve, but not to the extent that they may covet. But 
  > when one takes the opposite way-namely, when one tries to 
  > satisfy the senses of Govinda without desiring to satisfy 
  > one's own senses-then by the grace of Govinda all desires 
  > of the living entity are satisfied. Arjuna's deep affection 
  > for community and family members is exhibited here partly 
  > due to his natural compassion for them. He is therefore not 
  > prepared to fight. Everyone wants to show his opulence to 
  > friends and relatives, but Arjuna fears that all his 
  > relatives and friends will be killed in the battlefield, 
  > and he will be unable to share his opulence after victory. 
  > This is a typical calculation of material life. The 
  > transcendental life is, however, different. Since a 
  > devotee wants to satisfy the desires of the Lord, he can, 
  > Lord willing, accept all kinds of opulence for the service 
  > of the Lord, and if the Lord is not willing, he should not 
  > accept a farthing. Arjuna did not want to kill his 
  > relatives, and if there were any need to kill them, he 
  > desired that Krsna kill them personally. At this point he 
  > did not know that Krsna had already killed them before 
  > their coming into the battlefield and that he was only to 
  > become an instrument for Krsna. This fact is disclosed in 
  > following chapters. As a natural devotee of the Lord, 
  > Arjuna did not like to retaliate against his miscreant 
  > cousins and brothers, but it was the Lord's plan that they 
  > should all be killed. The devotee of the Lord does not 
  > retaliate against the wrongdoer, but the Lord does not 
  > tolerate any mischief done to the devotee by the miscreants.
  >  The Lord can excuse a person on His own account, but He 
  > excuses no one who has done harm to His devotees. Therefore 
  > the Lord was determined to kill the miscreants, although 
  > Arjuna wanted to excuse them.
  > 
346 Bg 1.36
347 
348 TEXT 36
349 
350 TRANSLATION
351 
352 Sin will overcome us if we slay such aggressors. Therefore 
353 it is not proper for us to kill the sons of Dhrtarastra and 
  > our friends. What should we gain, O Krsna, husband of the 
  > goddess of fortune, and how could we be happy by killing 
  > our own kinsmen?
  > 
354 PURPORT
355 
356 According to Vedic injunctions there are six kinds of 
357 aggressors: 1) a poison giver, 2) one who sets fire to 
  > the house, 3) one who attacks with deadly weapons, 4) one 
  > who plunders riches, 5) one who occupies another's land, 
  > and 6) one who kidnaps a wife. Such aggressors are at once 
  > to be killed, and no sin is incurred by killing such 
  > aggressors. Such killing of aggressors is quite befitting 
  > for any ordinary man, but Arjuna was not an ordinary person.
  >  He was saintly by character, and therefore he wanted to 
  > deal with them in saintliness. This kind of saintliness, 
  > however, is not for a ksatriya. Although a responsible man 
  > in the administration of a state is required to be saintly, 
  > he should not be cowardly. For example, Lord Rama was so 
  > saintly that people were anxious to live in His 
  > kingdom, (Rama-rajya), but Lord Rama never 
  > showed any cowardice. Ravana was an aggressor against Rama 
  > because he kidnapped Rama's wife, Sita, but Lord Rama 
  > gave him sufficient lessons, unparalleled in the history of 
  > the world. In Arjuna's case, however, one should consider 
  > the special type of aggressors, namely his own grandfather, 
  > own teacher, friends, sons, grandsons, etc. Because of them,
  >  Arjuna thought that he should not take the severe steps 
  > necessary against ordinary aggressors. Besides that, 
  > saintly persons are advised to forgive. Such injunctions 
  > for saintly persons are more important than any political 
  > emergency. Arjuna considered that rather than kill his own 
  > kinsmen for political reasons, it would be better to 
  > forgive them on grounds of religion and saintly behavior. 
  > He did not, therefore, consider such killing profitable 
  > simply for the matter of temporary bodily happiness. After 
  > all, kingdoms and pleasures derived therefrom are not 
  > permanent, so why should he risk his life and eternal 
  > salvation by killing his own kinsmen? Arjuna's addressing 
  > of Krsna as "Madhava," or the husband of the goddess of 
  > fortune, is also significant in this connection. He wanted 
  > to point out to Krsna that, as husband of the goddess of 
  > fortune, He should not have to induce Arjuna to take up a 
  > matter which would ultimately bring about misfortune. Krsna,
  >  however, never brings misfortune to anyone, to say nothing 
  > of His devotees.
  > 
358 Bg 1.37, Bg 1.38, Bg 1.37-38
359 
360 TEXTS 37-38
361 
362 TRANSLATION
363 
364 O Janardana, although these men, overtaken by 
365 greed, see no fault in killing one's family or quarreling 
  > with friends, why should we, with knowledge of the sin
  > , engage in these acts?
  > 
366 PURPORT
367 
368 A ksatriya is not supposed to refuse to battle or gamble 
369 when he is so invited by some rival party. Under such 
  > obligation, Arjuna could not refuse to fight because he 
  > was challenged by the party of Duryodhana. In this 
  > connection, Arjuna considered that the other party might be 
  > blind to the effects of such a challenge. Arjuna, however, 
  > could see the evil consequences and could not accept the 
  > challenge. Obligation is actually binding when the effect 
  > is good, but when the effect is otherwise, then no one can 
  > be bound. Considering all these pros and cons, Arjuna 
  > decided not to fight.
  > 
370 Bg 1.39
371 
372 TEXT 39
373 
374 TRANSLATION
375 
376 With the destruction of dynasty, the eternal family 
377 tradition is vanquished, and thus the rest of the family 
  > becomes involved in irreligious practice.
  > 
378 PURPORT
379 
380 In the system of the varnasrama institution there are many 
381 principles of religious traditions to help members of the 
  > family grow properly and attain spiritual values. The elder 
  > members are responsible for such purifying processes in the 
  > family, beginning from birth to death. But on the death of 
  > the elder members, such family traditions of purification 
  > may stop, and the remaining younger family members may 
  > develop irreligious habits and thereby lose their chance 
  > for spiritual salvation. Therefore, for no purpose should 
  > the elder members of the family be slain.
  > 
382 Bg 1.40
383 
384 TEXT 40
385 
386 TRANSLATION
387 
388 When irreligion is prominent in the family, O Krsna, the 
389 women of the family become corrupt, and from the 
  > degradation of womanhood, O descendant of Vrsni, comes 
  > unwanted progeny.
  > 
390 PURPORT
391 
392 Good population in human society is the basic principle for 
393 peace, prosperity and spiritual progress in life. The 
  > varnasrama religion's principles were so designed that the 
  > good population would prevail in society for the general 
  > spiritual progress of state and community. Such population 
  > depends on the chastity and faithfulness of its womanhood. 
  > As children are very prone to be misled, women are 
  > similarly very prone to degradation. Therefore, both 
  > children and women require protection by the elder members 
  > of the family. By being engaged in various religious 
  > practices, women will not be misled into adultery. 
  > According to Canakya Pandit, women are generally not very 
  > intelligent and therefore not trustworthy. So, the 
  > different family traditions of religious activities should 
  > always engage them, and thus their chastity and devotion 
  > will give birth to a good population eligible for 
  > participating in the varnasrama system. On the failure of 
  > such varnasrama-dharma, naturally the women become free to 
  > act and mix with men, and thus adultery is indulged in at 
  > the risk of unwanted population. Irresponsible men also 
  > provoke adultery in society, and thus unwanted children 
  > flood the human race at the risk of war and pestilence.
  > 
394 Bg 1.41
395 
396 TEXT 41
397 
398 TRANSLATION
399 
400 When there is increase of unwanted population, a 
401 hellish situation is created both for the family and 
  > for those who destroy the family tradition. In
  >  such corrupt families, there is no offering 
  > of oblations of food and water to the 
  > ancestors.
  > 
402 PURPORT
403 
404 According to the rules and regulations of fruitive 
405 activities, there is a need to offer periodical food and 
  > water to the forefathers of the family. This offering is 
  > performed by worship of Visnu, because eating the remnants 
  > of food offered to Visnu can deliver one from all kinds of 
  > sinful actions. Sometimes the forefathers may be suffering 
  > from various types of sinful reactions, and sometimes some 
  > of them cannot even acquire a gross material body and are 
  > forced to remain in subtle bodies as ghosts. Thus, when 
  > remnants of prasadam food are offered to forefathers by 
  > descendants, the forefathers are released from ghostly or 
  > other kinds of miserable life. Such help rendered to 
  > forefathers is a family tradition, and those who are not in 
  > devotional life are required to perform such rituals. One 
  > who is engaged in the devotional life is not required to 
  > perform such actions. Simply by performing devotional 
  > service, one can deliver hundreds and thousands of 
  > forefathers from all kinds of misery. It is stated in the 
  > Bhagavatam:
  > 
406 devarsi-bhutapta-nrnam pitrnam
407 
408 na kinkaro nayamrni ca rajan
409 
410 sarvatmana yah saranam saranyam
411 
412 gato mukundam 
    
413 parihrtya kartam
  > 
  > "Anyone who has taken shelter of the lotus feet of Mukunda, 
414 the giver of liberation, giving up all kinds of obligation, 
415 and has taken to the path in all seriousness, owes neither 
  > duties nor obligations to the demigods, sages, general 
  > living entities, family members, humankind or forefathers." 
  > (Bhag. 11.5.41) Such obligations are automatically 
  > fulfilled by performance of devotional service to the 
  > Supreme Personality of Godhead.
  > 
  > Bg 1.42
416 
417 TEXT 42
418 
419 TRANSLATION
420 
421 Due to the evil deeds of the destroyers of 
422 family tradition, 
423 all kinds of community projects and family welfare 
  > activities are devastated.
  > 
  > PURPORT
424 
425 The four orders of human society, 
426 combined with family welfare activities as they are set 
427 forth by the institution of the sanatana-dharma or 
  > varnasrama-dharma, are designed to enable the human being 
  > to attain his ultimate salvation. Therefore, the breaking 
  > of the sanatana-dharma tradition by irresponsible leaders 
  > of society brings about chaos in that society, and 
  > consequently people forget the aim of life-Visnu. Such 
  > leaders are called blind, and persons who follow such 
  > leaders are sure to be led into chaos.
  > 
  > Bg 1.43
428 
429 TEXT 43
430 
431 TRANSLATION
432 
433 O Krsna, maintainer of the people, I have heard by 
434 disciplic succession that those who destroy family 
435 traditions dwell always in hell.
  > 
  > PURPORT
436 
437 Arjuna bases his argument not on his own personal 
438 experience, but on what he has heard from the authorities. 
439 That is the way of receiving real knowledge. One cannot 
  > reach the real point of factual knowledge without being 
  > helped by the right person who is already established in 
  > that knowledge. There is a system in the varnasrama 
  > institution by which one has to undergo the 
  > process of ablution before death for his sinful activities.
  >  One who is always engaged in sinful activities must 
  > utilize the process of ablution called the prayascitta. 
  > Without doing so, one surely will be transferred to hellish 
  > planets to undergo miserable lives as the result of sinful 
  > activities.
  > 
  > Bg 1.44
440 
441 TEXT 44
442 
443 TRANSLATION
444 
445 Alas, how strange it is that we are preparing to commit 
446 greatly sinful acts, driven by the desire to enjoy royal 
447 happiness.
  > 
  > PURPORT
448 
449 Driven by selfish motives, one may be inclined to such 
450 sinful acts as the killing of one's own brother, father, or 
451 mother. There are many such instances in the history of the 
  > world. But Arjuna, being a saintly devotee of the Lord, is 
  > always conscious of moral principles and therefore takes 
  > care to avoid such activities.
  > 
  > Bg 1.45
452 
453 TEXT 45
454 
455 TRANSLATION
456 
457 I would consider it better for the sons of 
458 Dhrtarastra to kill me unarmed and 
459 unresisting, rather than fight with them.
  > 
  > PURPORT
460 
461 It is the custom-according to ksatriya fighting principles-
462 that an unarmed and unwilling foe should not be attacked. 
463 Arjuna, however, 
  > in such an enigmatic position, decided he would not fight 
  > if he were attacked by the enemy. He did not consider how 
  > much the other party was bent upon fighting. All these 
  > symptoms are due to softheartedness resulting 
  > from his being a great devotee of the Lord.
  > 
  > Bg 1.46
464 
465 TEXT 46
466 
467 TRANSLATION
468 
469 Sanjaya said: Arjuna, having thus spoken on the battlefield,
470  cast aside his bow and arrows and sat down on the chariot, 
471 his mind overwhelmed with grief.
  > 
  > PURPORT
472 
473 While observing the situation of his enemy, Arjuna stood up 
474 on the chariot, but he was so afflicted with lamentation 
475 that he sat down again, setting aside his bow and arrows. 
  > Such a kind and softhearted person, in the 
  > devotional service of the Lord, is fit to receive self-
  > knowledge.
  > 
  > Thus end the Bhaktivedanta Purports to the First Chapter of 
476 the Srimad-Bhagavad-gita in the matter of Observing the 
477 Armies on the Battlefield of Kuruksetra.
  > 
  1 Chapter 1
  2 
  3 Observing the Armies on the Battlefield of Kuruksetra
  4 
  5 Bg 1.1
  6 
  7 TEXT 1
  8 
  9 TRANSLATION
 10 
 11 Dhrtarastra said: O Sanjaya, after my sons and the 
  > sons of Pandu assembled in the place of 
  > pilgrimage at Kuruksetradesiring to fight, what 
  > did they do?
 12 
 13 PURPORT
 14 
 15 Bhagavad-gita is the widely read theistic science 
  > summarized in the Gita-mahatmya (Glorification of the Gita).
  >  There it says that one should read Bhagavad-gita very 
  > scrutinizingly with the help of a person who is a devotee 
  > of Sri Krsna and try to understand it without personally 
  > motivated interpretations. The example of clear 
  > understanding is there in the Bhagavad-gita itself, in the 
  > way the teaching is understood by Arjuna, who heard the 
  > Gita directly from the Lord. If someone is fortunate enough 
  > to understand Bhagavad-gita in that line of disciplic 
  > succession, without motivated interpretation, then he 
  > surpasses all studies of Vedic wisdom, and all scriptures 
  > of the world. One will find in the Bhagavad-gita all that 
  > is contained in other scriptures, but the reader will also 
  > find things which are not to be found elsewhere. That is 
  > the specific standard of the Gita. It is the perfect 
  > theistic science because it is directly spoken by the 
  > Supreme Personality of Godhead, Lord Sri Krsna.
 16 
 17 The topics discussed by Dhrtarastra and Sanjaya, as 
  > described in the Mahabharata, form the basic principle for 
  > this great philosophy. It is understood that this 
  > philosophy evolved on the Battlefield of Kuruksetra, which 
  > is a sacred place of pilgrimage from the immemorial time of 
  > the Vedic age. It was spoken by the Lord when He was 
  > present personally on this planet for the guidance of 
  > mankind.
 18 
 19 The word dharma-ksetra (a place where religious rituals are 
  > performed) is significant because, on the Battlefield of 
  > Kuruksetra, the Supreme Personality of Godhead was present 
  > on the side of Arjuna. Dhrtarastra, the father of the Kurus,
  >  was highly doubtful about the possibility of his sons' 
  > ultimate victory. In his doubt, he inquired from his 
  > secretary Sanjaya, "What did they
  >  do?" He was confident that both his sons and the sons 
  > of his younger brother Pandu were assembled in that Field 
  > of Kuruksetra for a determined engagement of the war. Still,
  >  his inquiry is significant. He did not want a compromise 
  > between the cousins and brothers, and he wanted to be sure 
  > of the fate of his sons on the battlefield. Because the 
  > battle was arranged to be fought at Kuruksetra, which is 
  > mentioned elsewhere in the Vedas as a place of worship-even 
  > for the denizens of heaven-Dhrtarastra became very fearful 
  > about the influence of the holy place on the outcome of the 
  > battle. He knew very well that this would influence Arjuna 
  > and the sons of Pandu favorably, because by nature they 
  > were all virtuous. Sanjaya was a student of Vyasa, and 
  > therefore, by the mercy of Vyasa, Sanjaya was able to 
  > envision the Battlefield of Kuruksetra even while he was in 
  > the room of Dhrtarastra. And so, Dhrtarastra asked him 
  > about the situation on the battlefield.
 20 
 21 Both the Pandavas and the sons of Dhrtarastra belong to the 
  > same family, but Dhrtarastra's mind is disclosed herein. He 
  > deliberately claimed only his sons as Kurus, and he 
  > separated the sons of Pandu from the family heritage. One 
  > can thus understand the specific position of Dhrtarastra in 
  > his relationship with his nephews, the sons of Pandu. As in 
  > the paddy field the unnecessary plants are taken out, so it 
  > is expected from the very beginning of these topics that in 
  > the religious field of Kuruksetra, where the father of 
  > religion, Sri Krsna, was present, the unwanted plants like 
  > Dhrtarastra's son Duryodhana and others would be wiped out 
  > and the thoroughly religious persons, headed by Yudhisthira,
  >  would be established by the Lord. This is the significance 
  > of the words dharma-ksetre and kuru-ksetre, apart from 
  > their historical and Vedic importance.
 22 
 23 Bg 1.2
 24 
 25 TEXT 2
 26 
 27 TRANSLATION
 28 
 29 Sanjaya said: O King, after looking over the army arranged 
  > in military formation by the sons of Pandu, King Duryodhana 
  > went to his teacher and spoke the following words.
 30 
 31 PURPORT
 32 
 33 Dhrtarastra was blind from birth. Unfortunately, he was 
  > also bereft of spiritual vision. He knew very well that his 
  > sons were equally blind in the matter of religion, and he 
  > was sure that they could never reach an understanding with 
  > the Pandavas, who were all pious since birth. Still he was 
  > doubtful about the influence of the place of pilgrimage, 
  > and Sanjaya could understand his motive in asking about the 
  > situation on the battlefield. Sanjaya wanted, therefore, to 
  > encourage the despondent king and thus assured him 
  > that his sons were not going to make any sort of compromise 
  > under the influence of the holy place. Sanjaya therefore 
  > informed the king that his son, Duryodhana, after seeing 
  > the military force of the Pandavas, at once went to the 
  > commander in chief, Dronacarya, to inform him of the real 
  > position. Although Duryodhana is mentioned as the king, he 
  > still had to go to the commander on account of the 
  > seriousness of the situation. He was therefore quite fit to 
  > be a politician. But Duryodhana's diplomatic veneer could 
  > not disguise the fear he felt when he saw the military 
  > arrangement of the Pandavas.
 34 
 35 Bg 1.3
 36 
 37 TEXT 3
 38 
 39 TRANSLATION
 40 
 41 O my teacher, behold the great army of the sons of Pandu, 
  > so expertly arranged by your intelligent disciple the son 
  > of Drupada.
 42 
 43 PURPORT
 44 
 45 Duryodhana, a great diplomat, wanted to point out the 
  > defects of Dronacarya, the great brahmana commander in 
  > chief. Dronacarya had some political quarrel with King 
  > Drupada, the father of Draupadi, who was Arjuna's wife. As 
  > a result of this quarrel, Drupada performed a great 
  > sacrifice, by which he received the benediction of having a 
  > son who would be able to kill Dronacarya. Dronacarya knew 
  > this perfectly well, and yet as a liberal brahmana he did 
  > not hesitate to impart all his military secrets when the 
  > son of Drupada, Dhrstadyumna, was entrusted to him for 
  > military education. Now, on the Battlefield of Kuruksetra, 
  > Dhrstadyumna took the side of the Pandavas, and it was he 
  > who arranged for their military phalanx, after having 
  > learned the art from Dronacarya. Duryodhana pointed out 
  > this mistake of Dronacarya's so that he might be alert and 
  > uncompromising in the fighting. By this he wanted to point 
  > out also that he should not be similarly lenient in battle 
  > against the Pandavas, who were also Dronacarya's 
  > affectionate students. Arjuna, especially, was his most 
  > affectionate and brilliant student. Duryodhana also warned 
  > that such leniency in the fight would lead to defeat.
 46 
 47 Bg 1.4
 48 
 49 TEXT 4
 50 
 51 TRANSLATION
 52 
 53 Here in this army are many heroic bowmen equal in 
  > fighting to Bhima and Arjuna: great fighters 
  > like Yuyudhana, Virata and Drupada.
 54 
 55 PURPORT
 56 
 57 Even though Dhrstadyumna was not a very important obstacle 
  > in the face of Dronacarya's very great power in the 
  > military art, there were many others who were causes 
  > of fear. They are mentioned by Duryodhana as great 
  > stumbling blocks on the path of victory because each and 
  > every one of them was as formidable as Bhima and Arjuna. He 
  > knew the strength of Bhima and Arjuna, and thus he compared 
  > the others with them.
 58 
 59 Bg 1.5
 60 
 61 TEXT 5
 62 
 63 TRANSLATION
 64 
 65 There are also great, heroic, powerful fighters like 
  > Dhrstaketu, Cekitana, Kasiraja, Purujit, Kuntibhoja and 
  > Saibya.
 66 
 67 Bg 1.6
 68 
 69 TEXT 6
 70 
 71 TRANSLATION
 72 
 73 There are the mighty Yudhamanyu, the very powerful 
  > Uttamauja, the son of Subhadra and the sons of Draupadi. 
  > All these warriors are great chariot fighters.
 74 
 75 Bg 1.7
 76 
 77 TEXT 7
 78 
 79 TRANSLATION
 80 
 81 But for your information, O best of the brahmanas
  > , let me tell you about the captains who are 
  > especially qualified to lead my military force.
 82 
 83 Bg 1.8
 84 
 85 TEXT 8
 86 
 87 TRANSLATION
 88 
 89 There are personalities like you, Bhisma, Karna, Krpa, 
  > Asvatthama, Vikarna and the son of Somadatta called 
  > Bhurisrava, who are always victorious in battle.
 90 
 91 PURPORT
 92 
 93 Duryodhana mentions the exceptional heroes in the battle, 
  > all of whom are ever victorious. Vikarna is the brother of 
  > Duryodhana, Asvatthama is the son of Dronacarya, and 
  > Saumadatti, or Bhurisrava, is the son of the King of the 
  > Bahlikas. Karna is the half brother of Arjuna, as he was 
  > born of Kunti before her marriage with King Pandu. 
  > Krpacarya's twin sister married Dronacarya.
 94 
 95 Bg 1.9
 96 
 97 TEXT 9
 98 
 99 TRANSLATION
100 
101 There are many other heroes who are prepared to lay down 
  > their lives for my sake. All of them are well equipped with 
  > different kinds of weapons, and all are experienced in 
  > military science.
102 
103 PURPORT
104 
105 As far as the others are concerned-like Jayadratha, 
  > Krtavarma and Salya-all are determined to lay down 
  > their lives for Duryodhana's sake. In other words, it is 
  > already concluded that all of them would die in the Battle 
  > of Kuruksetra for joining the party of the sinful 
  > Duryodhana. Duryodhana was, of course, confident of his 
  > victory on account of the above-mentioned combined strength 
  > of his friends.
106 
107 Bg 1.10
108 
109 TEXT 10
110 
111 TRANSLATION
112 
113 Our strength is immeasurable, and we are perfectly 
  > protected by Grandfather Bhisma, whereas the strength of 
  > the Pandavas, carefully protected by Bhima, is limited.
114 
115 PURPORT
116 
117 Herein an estimation of comparative strength is made by 
  > Duryodhana. He thinks that the strength of his armed forces 
  > is immeasurable, being specifically protected by the most 
  > experienced general, Grandfather Bhisma. On the other hand, 
  > the forces of the Pandavas are limited, being protected by 
  > a less experienced general, Bhima, who is like a fig in the 
  > presence of Bhisma. Duryodhana was always envious of Bhima 
  > because he knew perfectly well that if he should die at all,
  >  he would only be killed by Bhima. But at the same time, he 
  > was confident of his victory on account of the presence of 
  > Bhisma, who was a far superior general. His conclusion that 
  > he would come out of the battle victorious was well 
  > ascertained.
118 
119 Bg 1.11
120 
121 TEXT 11
122 
123 TRANSLATION
124 
125 All of you must now give full support to Grandfather 
  > Bhisma, as you stand at your respective strategic 
  > points of entrance into the phalanx of the army.
126 
127 PURPORT
128 
129 Duryodhana, after praising the prowess of Bhisma, further 
  > considered that others might think that they had been 
  > considered less important, so in his usual diplomatic way, 
  > he tried to adjust the situation in the above words. He 
  > emphasized that Bhismadeva was undoubtedly the greatest 
  > hero, but he was an old man, so everyone must especially 
  > think of his protection from all sides. He might become 
  > engaged in the fight, and the enemy might take advantage of 
  > his full engagement on one side. Therefore, it was 
  > important that other heroes not leave their strategic 
  > positions and allow the enemy to break the phalanx. 
  > Duryodhana clearly felt that the victory of the Kurus 
  > depended on the presence of Bhismadeva. He was confident of 
  > the full support of Bhismadeva and Dronacarya in the battle 
  > because he well knew that they did not even speak a word 
  > when Arjuna's wife Draupadi, in her helpless condition, had 
  > appealed to them for justice while she was being forced to 
  > appear naked in the presence of all the great generals in 
  > the assembly. Although he knew that the two generals had 
  > some sort of affection for the Pandavas, he hoped that 
  > these generals would now completely give it up
  > , as they had done during the gambling 
  > performances.
130 
131 Bg 1.12
132 
133 TEXT 12
134 
135 TRANSLATION
136 
137 Then Bhisma, the great valiant grandsire of the Kuru 
  > dynasty, the grandfather of the fighters, blew his 
  > conchshell very loudly, making a sound like the roar of a 
  > lion, giving Duryodhana joy.
138 
139 PURPORT
140 
141 The grandsire of the Kuru dynasty could understand the 
  > inner meaning of the heart of his grandson Duryodhana, and 
  > out of his natural compassion for him he tried to cheer him 
  > by blowing his conchshell very loudly, befitting his 
  > position as a lion. Indirectly, by the symbolism of the 
  > conchshell, he informed his depressed grandson Duryodhana 
  > that he had no chance of victory in the battle, because the 
  > Supreme Lord Krsna was on the other side. But still, it was 
  > his duty to conduct the fight, and no pains would be spared 
  > in that connection.
142 
143 Bg 1.13
144 
145 TEXT 13
146 
147 TRANSLATION
148 
149 After that, the conchshells, drums, bugles, trumpets and 
  > horns were all suddenly sounded, and the combined sound was 
  > tumultuous.
150 
151 Bg 1.14
152 
153 TEXT 14
154 
155 TRANSLATION
156 
157 On the other side, both Lord Krsna and Arjuna, stationed on 
  > a great chariot drawn by white horses, sounded their 
  > transcendental conchshells.
158 
159 PURPORT
160 
161 In contrast with the conchshell blown by Bhismadeva, the 
  > conchshells in the hands of Krsna and Arjuna are described 
  > as transcendental. The sounding of the transcendental 
  > conchshells indicated that there was no hope of victory for 
  > the other side because Krsna was on the side of the 
  > Pandavas. Jayas tu pandu-putranam yesam pakse janardanah. 
  > Victory is always with persons like the sons of Pandu 
  > because Lord Krsna is associated with them. And whenever 
  > and wherever the Lord is present, the goddess of fortune is 
  > also there because the goddess of fortune never lives alone 
  > without her husband. Therefore, victory and fortune were 
  > awaiting Arjuna, as indicated by the transcendental sound 
  > produced by the conchshell of Visnu, or Lord Krsna. Besides 
  > that, the chariot on which both the friends were seated had 
  > been donated by Agni (the fire-god) to Arjuna, and this 
  > indicated that this chariot was capable of conquering all 
  > sides, wherever it was drawn over the three worlds.
162 
163 Bg 1.15
164 
165 TEXT 15
166 
167 TRANSLATION
168 
169 Lord Krsna blew His conchshell, called Pancajanya; 
  > Arjuna blew his, the Devadatta; and Bhima, the voracious 
  > eater and performer of herculean tasks, blew his terrific 
  > conchshell, called Paundra.
170 
171 PURPORT
172 
173 Lord Krsna is referred to as Hrsikesa in this verse because 
  > He is the owner of all senses. The living entities are part 
  > and parcel of Him, and therefore the senses of the living 
  > entities are also part and parcel of His senses. The 
  > impersonalists cannot account for the senses of the living 
  > entities, and therefore they are always anxious to describe 
  > all living entities as sense-less, or impersonal. The Lord, 
  > situated in the hearts of all living entities, directs 
  > their senses. But He directs in terms of the surrender of 
  > the living entity, and in the case of a pure devotee He 
  > directly controls the senses. Here on the Battlefield of 
  > Kuruksetra the Lord directly controls the transcendental 
  > senses of Arjuna, and thus His particular name of Hrsikesa. 
  > The Lord has different names according to His different 
  > activities. For example, His name is Madhusudana because He 
  > killed the demon of the name Madhu; His name is Govinda 
  > because He gives pleasure to the cows and to the senses; 
  > His name is Vasudeva because He appeared as the son of 
  > Vasudeva; His name is Devaki-nandana because He accepted 
  > Devaki as His mother; His name is Yasoda-nandana because He 
  > awarded His childhood pastimes to Yasoda at Vrndavana; His 
  > name is Partha-sarathi because He worked as charioteer of 
  > His friend Arjuna. Similarly, His name is Hrsikesa because 
  > He gave direction to Arjuna on the Battlefield of 
  > Kuruksetra.
174 
175 Arjuna is referred to as Dhananjaya in this verse because 
  > he helped his elder brother in fetching wealth when it was 
  > required by the king to make expenditures for different 
  > sacrifices. Similarly, Bhima is known as Vrkodara because 
  > he could eat as voraciously as he could perform herculean 
  > tasks, such as killing the demon Hidimba. So the 
  > particular types of conchshell blown by the different 
  > personalities on the side of the Pandavas, beginning with 
  > the Lord's, were all very encouraging to the fighting 
  > soldiers. On the other side there were no such credits, nor 
  > the presence of Lord Krsna, the supreme director, nor that 
  > of the goddess of fortune. So they were predestined to 
  > lose the battle-and that was the message announced by the 
  > sounds of the conchshells.
176 
177 Bg 1.16-18
178 
179 TEXTS 1618
180 
181 TRANSLATION
182 
183 King Yudhisthira, the son of Kunti, blew his conchshell, 
  > the Ananta-vijaya, and Nakula and Sahadeva blew the 
  > Sughosa and Manipuspaka. That great archer the King of Kasi,
  >  the great fighter Sikhandi, Dhrstadyumna, Virata, the 
  > unconquerable Satyaki, Drupada, the sons of Draupadi, and 
  > the others, O King, such as the mighty-armed son of 
  > Subhadra, all blew their respective 
  > conchshells.
184 
185 PURPORT
186 
187 Sanjaya informed King Dhrtarastra very tactfully that his 
  > unwise policy of deceiving the sons of Pandu and 
  > endeavoring to enthrone his own sons on the seat of the 
  > kingdom was not very laudable. The signs already clearly 
  > indicated that the whole Kuru dynasty would be killed in 
  > that great battle. Beginning with the grandsire, Bhisma, 
  > down to the grandsons like Abhimanyu and others-including 
  > kings from many states of the world-all were present there, 
  > and all were doomed. The whole catastrophe was due to King 
  > Dhrtarastra, because he encouraged the policy followed by 
  > his sons.
188 
189 Bg 1.19
190 
191 TEXT 19
192 
193 TRANSLATION
194 
195 The blowing of these different conchshells became 
  > uproarious. Vibrating both in the sky and 
  > on the earth, it shattered the hearts of the sons of 
  > Dhrtarastra.
196 
197 PURPORT
198 
199 When Bhisma and the others on the side of Duryodhana blew 
  > their respective conchshells, there was no heart-breaking 
  > on the part of the Pandavas. Such occurrences are not 
  > mentioned, but in this particular verse it is mentioned 
  > that the hearts of the sons of Dhrtarastra were shattered 
  > by the sounds vibrated by the Pandavas' party. This is due 
  > to the Pandavas and their confidence in Lord Krsna. One who 
  > takes shelter of the Supreme Lord has nothing to fear, even 
  > in the midst of the greatest calamity.
200 
201 Bg 1.20
202 
203 TEXT 20
204 
205 TRANSLATION
206 
207 At that time Arjuna, the son of Pandu, 
  > seated in the chariot bearing the flag marked with Hanuman,
  >  took up his bow and prepared to shoot his arrows. O King
  > after looking at the sons of Dhrtarastra drawn in 
  > military array, Arjuna then spoke to Lord Krsna these 
  > words.
208 
209 PURPORT
210 
211 The battle was just about to begin. It is understood from 
  > the above statement that the sons of Dhrtarastra were more 
  > or less disheartened by the unexpected arrangement of 
  > military force by the Pandavas, who were guided by the 
  > direct instructions of Lord Krsna on the battlefield. The 
  > emblem of Hanuman on the flag of Arjuna is another sign of 
  > victory because Hanuman cooperated with Lord Rama in the 
  > battle between Rama and Ravana, and Lord Rama emerged 
  > victorious. Now both Rama and Hanuman were present on the 
  > chariot of Arjuna to help him. Lord Krsna is Rama Himself, 
  > and wherever Lord Rama is, His eternal servitor Hanuman and 
  > His eternal consort Sita, the goddess of fortune, are 
  > present. Therefore, Arjuna had no cause to fear any enemies 
  > whatsoever. And above all, the Lord of the senses, Lord 
  > Krsna, was personally present to give him direction. Thus, 
  > all good counsel was available to Arjuna in the matter of 
  > executing the battle. In such auspicious conditions, 
  > arranged by the Lord for His eternal devotee, lay the signs 
  > of assured victory.
212 
213 Bg 1.21-22
214 
215 TEXTS 2122
216 
217 TRANSLATION
218 
219 Arjuna said: O infallible one, please draw my chariot 
  > between the two armies so that I may see those present 
  > here, who desire to fight, and with whom I must 
  > contend in this great trial of arms.
220 
221 PURPORT
222 
223 Although Lord Krsna is the Supreme Personality of Godhead, 
  > out of His causeless mercy He was engaged in the service of 
  > His friend. He never fails in His affection for His 
  > devotees, and thus He is addressed herein as infallible. As 
  > charioteer, He had to carry out the orders of Arjuna, and 
  > since He did not hesitate to do so, He is addressed as 
  > infallible. Although He had accepted the position of a 
  > charioteer for His devotee, His supreme position was not 
  > challenged. In all circumstances, He is the Supreme 
  > Personality of Godhead, Hrsikesa, the Lord of the total 
  > senses. The relationship between the Lord and His servitor 
  > is very sweet and transcendental. The servitor is always 
  > ready to render service to the Lord, and, similarly, the 
  > Lord is always seeking an opportunity to render some 
  > service to the devotee. He takes greater pleasure in His 
  > pure devotee's assuming the advantageous position of 
  > ordering Him than He does in being the giver of orders. 
  > Since He is master, everyone is under His orders, and no 
  > one is above Him to order Him. But when He finds that a 
  > pure devotee is ordering Him, He obtains transcendental 
  > pleasure, although He is the infallible master of all 
  > circumstances.
224 
225 As a pure devotee of the Lord, Arjuna had no desire to 
  > fight with his cousins and brothers, but he was forced to 
  > come onto the battlefield by the obstinacy of Duryodhana, 
  > who was never agreeable to any peaceful negotiation. 
  > Therefore, he was very anxious to see who the leading 
  > persons present on the battlefield were. Although there was 
  > no question of a peacemaking endeavor on the battlefield, 
  > he wanted to see them again, and to see how much they were 
  > bent upon demanding an unwanted war.
226 
227 Bg 1.23
228 
229 TEXT 23
230 
231 TRANSLATION
232 
233 Let me see those who have come here to fight, wishing to 
  > please the evil-minded son of Dhrtarastra.
234 
235 PURPORT
236 
237 It was an open secret that Duryodhana wanted to usurp the 
  > kingdom of the Pandavas by evil plans, in collaboration 
  > with his father, Dhrtarastra. Therefore, all persons who 
  > had joined the side of Duryodhana must have been birds of 
  > the same feather. Arjuna wanted to see them on the 
  > battlefield before the fight was begun, just to learn who 
  > they were, but he had no intention of proposing peace 
  > negotiations with them. It was also a fact that he wanted 
  > to see them to make an estimate of the strength which he 
  > had to face, although he was quite confident of victory 
  > because Krsna was sitting by his side.
238 
239 Bg 1.24
240 
241 TEXT 24
242 
243 TRANSLATION
244 
245 Sanjaya said: O descendant of Bharata, having thus been 
  > addressed by Arjuna, Lord Krsna drew up the fine chariot in 
  > the midst of the armies of both parties.
246 
247 PURPORT
248 
249 In this verse Arjuna is referred to as Gudakesa. Gudaka 
  > means sleep, and one who conquers sleep is called gudakesa. 
  > Sleep also means ignorance. So Arjuna conquered both sleep 
  > and ignorance because of his friendship with Krsna. As a 
  > great devotee of Krsna, he could not forget Krsna even for 
  > a moment, because that is the nature of a devotee. Either 
  > in waking or in sleep, a devotee of the Lord can never be 
  > free from thinking of Krsna's name, form, qualities and 
  > pastimes. Thus a devotee of Krsna can conquer both sleep 
  > and ignorance simply by thinking of Krsna constantly. This 
  > is called Krsna consciousness, or samadhi. As Hrsikesa, or 
  > the director of the senses and mind of every living entity, 
  > Krsna could understand Arjuna's purpose in placing the 
  > chariot in the midst of the armies. Thus He did so, and 
  > spoke as follows.
250 
251 Bg 1.25
252 
253 TEXT 25
254 
255 TRANSLATION
256 
257 In the presence of Bhisma, Drona and all the other 
  > chieftains of the world, the Lord said, Just 
  > behold, Partha, all the Kurus assembled here.
258 
259 PURPORT
260 
261 As the Supersoul of all living entities, Lord Krsna could 
  > understand what was going on in the mind of Arjuna. The use 
  > of the word Hrsikesa in this connection indicates that He 
  > knew everything. And the word Partha, or the son of Kunti, 
  > or Prtha, is also similarly significant in reference to 
  > Arjuna. As a friend, He wanted to inform Arjuna that 
  > because Arjuna was the son of Prtha, the sister of His own 
  > father Vasudeva, He had agreed to be the charioteer of 
  > Arjuna. Now what did Krsna mean when He told Arjuna to "
  > behold the Kurus"? Did Arjuna want to stop there and not 
  > fight? Krsna never expected such things from the son of His 
  > aunt Prtha. The mind of Arjuna was thus predicted by the 
  > Lord in friendly joking.
262 
263 Bg 1.26
264 
265 TEXT 26
266 
267 TRANSLATION
268 
269 There Arjuna could see, within the midst of the armies of 
  > both parties, his fathers, grandfathers, teachers, maternal 
  > uncles, brothers, sons, grandsons, friends, and also his 
  > fathers-in-law and well-wishers.
270 
271 PURPORT
272 
273 On the battlefield Arjuna could see all kinds of relatives. 
  > He could see persons like Bhurisrava, who were his father's 
  > contemporaries, grandfathers Bhisma and Somadatta, teachers 
  > like Dronacarya and Krpacarya, maternal uncles like Salya 
  > and Sakuni, brothers like Duryodhana, sons like Laksmana, 
  > friends like Asvatthama, well-wishers like Krtavarma, etc. 
  > He could see also the armies which contained many of his 
  > friends.
274 
275 Bg 1.27
276 
277 TEXT 27
278 
279 TRANSLATION
280 
281 When the son of Kunti, Arjuna, saw all these different 
  > grades of friends and relatives, he became overwhelmed with 
  > compassion and spoke thus.
282 
283 Bg 1.28
284 
285 TEXT 28
286 
287 TRANSLATION
288 
289 Arjuna said: My dear Krsna, seeing my friends and relatives 
  > present before me in such a fighting spirit, I feel the 
  > limbs of my body quivering and my mouth drying up.
290 
291 PURPORT
292 
293 Any man who has genuine devotion to the Lord has all the 
  > good qualities which are found in godly persons or in the 
  > demigods, whereas the nondevotee, however advanced he may 
  > be in material qualifications by education and culture, 
  > lacks in godly qualities. As such, Arjuna, just after 
  > seeing his kinsmen, friends and relatives on the 
  > battlefield, was at once overwhelmed by compassion for them 
  > who had so decided to fight amongst themselves. As far as 
  > his soldiers were concerned, he was sympathetic from the 
  > beginning, but he felt compassion even for the soldiers of 
  > the opposite party, foreseeing their imminent death. And 
  > while he was so thinking, the limbs of his body began to 
  > quiver, and his mouth became dry. He was more or less 
  > astonished to see their fighting spirit. Practically the 
  > whole community, all blood relatives of Arjuna, had come to 
  > fight with him. This overwhelmed a kind devotee like Arjuna.
  >  Although it is not mentioned here, still one can easily 
  > imagine that not only were Arjuna's bodily limbs quivering 
  > and his mouth drying up, but he was also crying out of 
  > compassion. Such symptoms in Arjuna were not due to 
  > weakness but to his softheartedness, a characteristic of a 
  > pure devotee of the Lord. It is said therefore:
294 
295 yasyasti bhaktir bhagavaty akincana sarvair gunais tatra 
  > samasate surah harav abhaktasya kuto mahad-guna mano-
  > rathenasati dhavato bahih
    
    
    
    
296 
297 "One who has unflinching devotion for the Personality of 
  > Godhead has all the good qualities of the demigods. But one 
  > who is not a devotee of the Lord has only material 
  > qualifications that are of little value. This is because he 
  > is hovering on the mental plane and is certain to be 
  > attracted by the glaring material energy." (Bhag. 5.18.12)
298 
299 Bg 1.29
300 
301 TEXT 29
302 
303 TRANSLATION
304 
305 My whole body is trembling, my hair is standing on end, 
  > my bow Gandiva is slipping from my hand, and my skin is 
  > burning.
306 
307 PURPORT
308 
309 There are two kinds of trembling of the body, and two kinds 
  > of standings of the hair on end. Such phenomena occur 
  > either in great spiritual ecstasy or out of great fear 
  > under material conditions. There is no fear in 
  > transcendental realization. Arjuna's symptoms in this 
  > situation are out of material fear-namely, loss of life. 
  > This is evident from other symptoms also; he became so 
  > impatient that his famous bow Gandiva was slipping from his 
  > hands, and, because his heart was burning within him, he 
  > was feeling a burning sensation of the skin. All these are 
  > due to a material conception of life.
310 
311 Bg 1.30
312 
313 TEXT 30
314 
315 TRANSLATION
316 
317 I am now unable to stand here any longer. I am forgetting 
  > myself, and my mind is reeling. I see only causes of 
  > misfortune, O Krsna, killer of the Kesi demon.
318 
319 PURPORT
320 
321 Due to his impatience, Arjuna was unable to stay on the 
  > battlefield, and he was forgetting himself on account of 
  > this weakness of his mind. Excessive attachment for 
  > material things puts a man in such a bewildering condition 
  > of existence. Bhayam dvitiyabhinivesatah syat (Bhag. 11.2.
  > 37): such fearfulness and loss of mental equilibrium take 
  > place in persons who are too affected by material 
  > conditions. Arjuna envisioned only painful reverses in 
  > the battlefield-he would not be happy even by gaining 
  > victory over the foe. The words nimittani viparitani are 
  > significant. When a man sees only frustration in his 
  > expectations, he thinks, "Why am I here?" Everyone is 
  > interested in himself and his own welfare. No one is 
  > interested in the Supreme Self. Arjuna is showing 
  > ignorance of his real self-interest by 
  > Krsna's will. One's real self-
  > interest lies in Visnu, or Krsna. The conditioned soul 
  > forgets this, and therefore suffers material pains. Arjuna 
  > thought that his victory in the battle would only be a 
  > cause of lamentation for him.
322 
323 Bg 1.31
324 
325 TEXT 31
326 
327 TRANSLATION
328 
329 I do not see how any good can come from killing my own 
  > kinsmen in this battle, nor can I, my dear Krsna, desire 
  > any subsequent victory, kingdom, or happiness.
330 
331 PURPORT
332 
333 Without knowing that one's self-interest is in Visnu (or 
  > Krsna), conditioned souls are attracted by bodily 
  > relationships, hoping to be happy in such situations. In 
  > such a blind conception of life, they forget 
  > even the causes of material happiness. Arjuna appears to 
  > have even forgotten the moral codes for a ksatriya. It is 
  > said that two kinds of men, namely the ksatriya who dies 
  > directly in front of the battlefield under Krsna's personal 
  > orders and the person in the renounced order of life who is 
  > absolutely devoted to spiritual culture, are eligible to 
  > enter into the sun globe, which is so powerful and dazzling.
  >  Arjuna is reluctant even to kill his enemies, let alone 
  > his relatives. He thinks that by killing his kinsmen there 
  > would be no happiness in his life, and therefore he is not 
  > willing to fight, just as a person who does not feel hunger 
  > is not inclined to cook. He has now decided to go into the 
  > forest and live a secluded life in frustration. But as a 
  > ksatriya, he requires a kingdom for his subsistence, 
  > because the ksatriyas cannot engage themselves in any other 
  > occupation. But Arjuna has no kingdom. Arjuna's sole 
  > opportunity for gaining a kingdom lies in fighting with his 
  > cousins and brothers and reclaiming the kingdom inherited 
  > from his father, which he does not like to do. Therefore he 
  > considers himself fit to go to the forest to live a 
  > secluded life of frustration.
334 
335 Bg 1.32-35
336 
337 TEXTS 3235
338 
339 TRANSLATION
340 
341 O Govinda, of what avail to us are a kingdom
  > happiness or even life itself when all those for whom we 
  > may desire them are now arrayed on this battlefield? O 
  > Madhusudana, when teachers, fathers, sons, grandfathers, 
  > maternal uncles, fathers-in-law, grandsons, brothers-in-law 
  > and other relatives are ready to give up their lives and 
  > properties and are standing before me, why should I 
  > wish to kill them, even though they might otherwise kill me?
  >  O maintainer of all living entities, I am not prepared 
  > to fight with them even in exchange for the three worlds, 
  > let alone this earth. What pleasure will we derive from 
  > killing the sons of Dhrtarastra?
342 
343 PURPORT
344 
345 Arjuna has addressed Lord Krsna as Govinda because Krsna is 
  > the object of all pleasures for cows and the senses. By 
  > using this significant word, Arjuna indicates that Krsna 
  > should understand what will satisfy Arjuna's senses. 
  > But Govinda is not meant for satisfying our senses. If 
  > we try to satisfy the senses of Govinda, however, then 
  > automatically our own senses are satisfied. Materially, 
  > everyone wants to satisfy his senses, and he wants God to 
  > be the order supplier for such satisfaction. The Lord will 
  > satisfy the senses of the living entities as much as they 
  > deserve, but not to the extent that they may covet. But 
  > when one takes the opposite way-namely, when one tries to 
  > satisfy the senses of Govinda without desiring to satisfy 
  > one's own senses-then by the grace of Govinda all desires 
  > of the living entity are satisfied. Arjuna's deep affection 
  > for community and family members is exhibited here partly 
  > due to his natural compassion for them. He is therefore not 
  > prepared to fight. Everyone wants to show his opulence to 
  > friends and relatives, but Arjuna fears that all his 
  > relatives and friends will be killed on the battlefield 
  > and he will be unable to share his opulence after victory. 
  > This is a typical calculation of material life. The 
  > transcendental life, however, is different. Since a 
  > devotee wants to satisfy the desires of the Lord, he can, 
  > Lord willing, accept all kinds of opulence for the service 
  > of the Lord, and if the Lord is not willing, he should not 
  > accept a farthing. Arjuna did not want to kill his 
  > relatives, and if there were any need to kill them, he 
  > desired that Krsna kill them personally. At this point he 
  > did not know that Krsna had already killed them before 
  > their coming into the battlefield and that he was only to 
  > become an instrument for Krsna. This fact is disclosed in 
  > following chapters. As a natural devotee of the Lord, 
  > Arjuna did not like to retaliate against his miscreant 
  > cousins and brothers, but it was the Lord's plan that they 
  > should all be killed. The devotee of the Lord does not 
  > retaliate against the wrongdoer, but the Lord does not 
  > tolerate any mischief done to the devotee by the miscreants.
  >  The Lord can excuse a person on His own account, but He 
  > excuses no one who has done harm to His devotees. Therefore 
  > the Lord was determined to kill the miscreants, although 
  > Arjuna wanted to excuse them.
346 
347 Bg 1.36
348 
349 TEXT 36
350 
351 TRANSLATION
352 
353 Sin will overcome us if we slay such aggressors. Therefore 
  > it is not proper for us to kill the sons of Dhrtarastra and 
  > our friends. What should we gain, O Krsna, husband of the 
  > goddess of fortune, and how could we be happy by killing 
  > our own kinsmen?
354 
355 PURPORT
356 
357 According to Vedic injunctions there are six kinds of 
  > aggressors: (1) a poison giver, (2) one who sets fire to 
  > the house, (3) one who attacks with deadly weapons, (4) one 
  > who plunders riches, (5) one who occupies another's land, 
  > and (6) one who kidnaps a wife. Such aggressors are at once 
  > to be killed, and no sin is incurred by killing such 
  > aggressors. Such killing of aggressors is quite befitting 
  > any ordinary man, but Arjuna was not an ordinary person.
  >  He was saintly by character, and therefore he wanted to 
  > deal with them in saintliness. This kind of saintliness, 
  > however, is not for a ksatriya. Although a responsible man 
  > in the administration of a state is required to be saintly, 
  > he should not be cowardly. For example, Lord Rama was so 
  > saintly that people even now are anxious to live in the 
  > kingdom of Lord Rama (rama-rajya), but Lord Rama never 
  > showed any cowardice. Ravana was an aggressor against Rama 
  > because Ravana kidnapped Rama's wife, Sita, but Lord Rama 
  > gave him sufficient lessons, unparalleled in the history of 
  > the world. In Arjuna's case, however, one should consider 
  > the special type of aggressors, namely his own grandfather, 
  > own teacher, friends, sons, grandsons, etc. Because of them,
  >  Arjuna thought that he should not take the severe steps 
  > necessary against ordinary aggressors. Besides that, 
  > saintly persons are advised to forgive. Such injunctions 
  > for saintly persons are more important than any political 
  > emergency. Arjuna considered that rather than kill his own 
  > kinsmen for political reasons, it would be better to 
  > forgive them on grounds of religion and saintly behavior. 
  > He did not, therefore, consider such killing profitable 
  > simply for the matter of temporary bodily happiness. After 
  > all, kingdoms and pleasures derived therefrom are not 
  > permanent, so why should he risk his life and eternal 
  > salvation by killing his own kinsmen? Arjuna's addressing 
  > of Krsna as "Madhava," or the husband of the goddess of 
  > fortune, is also significant in this connection. He wanted 
  > to point out to Krsna that, as husband of the goddess of 
  > fortune, He should not induce Arjuna to take up a 
  > matter which would ultimately bring about misfortune. Krsna,
  >  however, never brings misfortune to anyone, to say nothing 
  > of His devotees.
358 
359 Bg 1.37-38
360 
361 TEXTS 3738
362 
363 TRANSLATION
364 
365 O Janardana, although these men, their hearts overtaken by 
  > greed, see no fault in killing one's family or quarreling 
  > with friends, why should we, who can see the crime 
  > in destroying a family, engage in these acts of sin?
366 
367 PURPORT
368 
369 A ksatriya is not supposed to refuse to battle or gamble 
  > when he is so invited by some rival party. Under such an 
  > obligation, Arjuna could not refuse to fight, because he 
  > had been challenged by the party of Duryodhana. In this 
  > connection, Arjuna considered that the other party might be 
  > blind to the effects of such a challenge. Arjuna, however, 
  > could see the evil consequences and could not accept the 
  > challenge. Obligation is actually binding when the effect 
  > is good, but when the effect is otherwise, then no one can 
  > be bound. Considering all these pros and cons, Arjuna 
  > decided not to fight.
370 
371 Bg 1.39
372 
373 TEXT 39
374 
375 TRANSLATION
376 
377 With the destruction of dynasty, the eternal family 
  > tradition is vanquished, and thus the rest of the family 
  > becomes involved in irreligion.
378 
379 PURPORT
380 
381 In the system of the varnasrama institution there are many 
  > principles of religious traditions to help members of the 
  > family grow properly and attain spiritual values. The elder 
  > members are responsible for such purifying processes in the 
  > family, beginning from birth to death. But on the death of 
  > the elder members, such family traditions of purification 
  > may stop, and the remaining younger family members may 
  > develop irreligious habits and thereby lose their chance 
  > for spiritual salvation. Therefore, for no purpose should 
  > the elder members of the family be slain.
382 
383 Bg 1.40
384 
385 TEXT 40
386 
387 TRANSLATION
388 
389 When irreligion is prominent in the family, O Krsna, the 
  > women of the family become polluted, and from the 
  > degradation of womanhood, O descendant of Vrsni, comes 
  > unwanted progeny.
390 
391 PURPORT
392 
393 Good population in human society is the basic principle for 
  > peace, prosperity and spiritual progress in life. The 
  > varnasrama religion's principles were so designed that the 
  > good population would prevail in society for the general 
  > spiritual progress of state and community. Such population 
  > depends on the chastity and faithfulness of its womanhood. 
  > As children are very prone to be misled, women are 
  > similarly very prone to degradation. Therefore, both 
  > children and women require protection by the elder members 
  > of the family. By being engaged in various religious 
  > practices, women will not be misled into adultery. 
  > According to Canakya Pandita, women are generally not very 
  > intelligent and therefore not trustworthy. So the 
  > different family traditions of religious activities should 
  > always engage them, and thus their chastity and devotion 
  > will give birth to a good population eligible for 
  > participating in the varnasrama system. On the failure of 
  > such varnasrama-dharma, naturally the women become free to 
  > act and mix with men, and thus adultery is indulged in at 
  > the risk of unwanted population. Irresponsible men also 
  > provoke adultery in society, and thus unwanted children 
  > flood the human race at the risk of war and pestilence.
394 
395 Bg 1.41
396 
397 TEXT 41
398 
399 TRANSLATION
400 
401 An increase of unwanted population certainly 
  > causes hellish life both for the family and 
  > for those who destroy the family tradition. The ancestors 
  > of such corrupt families fall downbecause the 
  > performances for offering them food and water are entirely 
  > stopped.
402 
403 PURPORT
404 
405 According to the rules and regulations of fruitive 
  > activities, there is a need to offer periodical food and 
  > water to the forefathers of the family. This offering is 
  > performed by worship of Visnu, because eating the remnants 
  > of food offered to Visnu can deliver one from all kinds of 
  > sinful actions. Sometimes the forefathers may be suffering 
  > from various types of sinful reactions, and sometimes some 
  > of them cannot even acquire a gross material body and are 
  > forced to remain in subtle bodies as ghosts. Thus, when 
  > remnants of prasadam food are offered to forefathers by 
  > descendants, the forefathers are released from ghostly or 
  > other kinds of miserable life. Such help rendered to 
  > forefathers is a family tradition, and those who are not in 
  > devotional life are required to perform such rituals. One 
  > who is engaged in the devotional life is not required to 
  > perform such actions. Simply by performing devotional 
  > service, one can deliver hundreds and thousands of 
  > forefathers from all kinds of misery. It is stated in the 
  > Bhagavatam (11.5.41):
    
    
    
    
    
    
406 
407 devarsi-bhutapta-nrnam pitrnam na kinkaro nayam rni ca 
  > rajan sarvatmana yah saranam saranyam gato mukundam 
  > parihrtya kartam
408 
409 "Anyone who has taken shelter of the lotus feet of Mukunda, 
  > the giver of liberation, giving up all kinds of obligation, 
  > and has taken to the path in all seriousness, owes neither 
  > duties nor obligations to the demigods, sages, general 
  > living entities, family members, humankind or forefathers." 
  > Such obligations are automatically 
  > fulfilled by performance of devotional service to the 
  > Supreme Personality of Godhead.
410 
411 Bg 1.42
412 
413 TEXT 42
414 
415 TRANSLATION
416 
417 By the evil deeds of those who destroy the 
  > family tradition and thus give rise to unwanted children
  > all kinds of community projects and family welfare 
  > activities are devastated.
418 
419 PURPORT
420 
421 Community projects for the four orders of human society, 
  > combined with family welfare activities, as they are set 
  > forth by the institution of sanatana-dharma, or 
  > varnasrama-dharma, are designed to enable the human being 
  > to attain his ultimate salvation. Therefore, the breaking 
  > of the sanatana-dharma tradition by irresponsible leaders 
  > of society brings about chaos in that society, and 
  > consequently people forget the aim of life-Visnu. Such 
  > leaders are called blind, and persons who follow such 
  > leaders are sure to be led into chaos.
422 
423 Bg 1.43
424 
425 TEXT 43
426 
427 TRANSLATION
428 
429 O Krsna, maintainer of the people, I have heard by 
  > disciplic succession that those who destroy family 
  > traditions dwell always in hell.
430 
431 PURPORT
432 
433 Arjuna bases his argument not on his own personal 
  > experience, but on what he has heard from the authorities. 
  > That is the way of receiving real knowledge. One cannot 
  > reach the real point of factual knowledge without being 
  > helped by the right person who is already established in 
  > that knowledge. There is a system in the varnasrama 
  > institution by which before death one has to undergo the 
  > process of atonement for his sinful activities.
  >  One who is always engaged in sinful activities must 
  > utilize the process of atonement called the prayascitta. 
  > Without doing so, one surely will be transferred to hellish 
  > planets to undergo miserable lives as the result of sinful 
  > activities.
434 
435 Bg 1.44
436 
437 TEXT 44
438 
439 TRANSLATION
440 
441 Alas, how strange it is that we are preparing to commit 
  > greatly sinful acts. Driven by the desire to enjoy royal 
  > happiness, we are intent on killing our own kinsmen.
442 
443 PURPORT
444 
445 Driven by selfish motives, one may be inclined to such 
  > sinful acts as the killing of one's own brother, father or 
  > mother. There are many such instances in the history of the 
  > world. But Arjuna, being a saintly devotee of the Lord, is 
  > always conscious of moral principles and therefore takes 
  > care to avoid such activities.
446 
447 Bg 1.45
448 
449 TEXT 45
450 
451 TRANSLATION
452 
453 Better for me if the sons of Dhrtarastra,
  >  weapons in hand, were to kill me unarmed and unresisting 
  > on the battlefield.
454 
455 PURPORT
456 
457 It is the custom-according to ksatriya fighting principles-
  > that an unarmed and unwilling foe should not be attacked. 
  > Arjuna, however, decided that even if attacked by the enemy 
  > in such an awkward position, he would not fight
  > . He did not consider how 
  > much the other party was bent upon fighting. All these 
  > symptoms are due to soft-heartedness resulting 
  > from his being a great devotee of the Lord.
458 
459 Bg 1.46
460 
461 TEXT 46
462 
463 TRANSLATION
464 
465 Sanjaya said: Arjuna, having thus spoken on the battlefield,
  >  cast aside his bow and arrows and sat down on the chariot, 
  > his mind overwhelmed with grief.
466 
467 PURPORT
468 
469 While observing the situation of his enemy, Arjuna stood up 
  > on the chariot, but he was so afflicted with lamentation 
  > that he sat down again, setting aside his bow and arrows. 
  > Such a kind and soft-hearted person, in the 
  > devotional service of the Lord, is fit to receive self-
  > knowledge.
470 
471 Thus end the Bhaktivedanta Purports to the First Chapter of 
  > the Srimad Bhagavad-gita in the matter of Observing the 
  > Armies on the Battlefield of Kuruksetra.
472 
Legend:
Added(6+237)
Deleted(0+227)
Changed(185)
Changed words in changed(151)